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Melanoma
Medarex Announces FDA Fast Track Designations for Ipilimumab for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma; Fast Track Design
By admin at 2006-12-09 03:08
 

If a drug is given fast track status it is showing good results with patients in phase 1 trials, which is usually where only dose tolerance is done. Here is a link to clinical trials going on in the country with this antibodyterm. 

 

PRINCETON, N.J., Dec. 7 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Medarex, Inc. (NASDAQ:MEDX) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Fast Track designation for ipilimumab (also known as MDX- 010) used in combination with chemotherapyterm (dacarbazine) in previously untreated (first-line) metastaticterm melanoma patients. The FDA also has granted Fast Track designation for ipilimumab used as a monotherapy in previously treated (second-line) metastatic melanoma patients. Under the FDA Modernization Act of 1997, designation as a Fast Track product for a new drug or biological product means that the FDA has determined that the drug or biologic is intended for the treatment of a serious or life- threatening condition and demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs for such a condition, and that the FDA will facilitate the clinical development and expedite the review of a Biologics License Application for the product. "We are pleased with the Fast Track designations as we continue to work with our partner Bristol-Myers Squibb to advance the development of ipilimumab, and we believe that ipilimumab has the potential to play an important role in the fight against cancer," said Irwin Lerner, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Interim President and CEO of Medarex. About ipilimumab Ipilimumab is an investigational fully human antibody against human CTLA- 4, a molecule on T cells that is believed to be responsible for suppressing the immune response. Medarex and Bristol-Myers Squibb are investigating the potential of ipilimumab to enable the immune systems of cancer patients to help suppress or eradicate cancer tumors. Ipilimumab is currently under investigation in several registrational clinical trials under Special Protocol Assessment agreements with the FDA for the treatment of metastatic melanoma -- as a first-line treatment in combination with dacarbazine, as a second-line monotherapy (enrollment expected to be completed this year) and as a second- line treatment in combination with MDX-1379 (a melanoma peptide vaccine). The combination with MDX-1379 was previously granted Fast Track designation. Ipilimumab is also being evaluated in multiple Phase II clinical trials to investigate the product's potential activity in other tumor types, as well as in combination studies with chemotherapy, immunotherapy and vaccines. Further information regarding Medarex's and Bristol-Myers Squibb's ipilimumab program can be found in Medarex's public disclosure filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

833 reads

Gene Changes Linked to Most Common Form of Melanoma
By admin at 2006-11-22 11:08
 

 

A new study may shed some light on why some people develop melanoma on parts of their bodies that don't get much sun.

 

Researchers say these people often have a variation in a gene called MC1R which makes the skin sensitive to small amounts of any type of ultraviolet (UV) light.

 

Why it's important: Melanoma can be a deadly cancer that often strikes people in early adulthood and middle age. In 2006, an estimated 62,190 people in the United States will be diagnosed with melanoma and nearly 8,000 people will die from this cancer. Some people seem especially prone to melanoma. If doctors could identify who these people are, they might be able to take steps to reduce their risk. There are no tests available yet, but the information from this study may be a step in that direction.

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