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Breast Cancer
Ingredient Found In Green Tea Significantly Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth In Female Mice
By Dross at 2008-04-07 22:33
 

Green tea is high in the antioxidant EGCG (epigallocatechin-3- gallate) which helps prevent the body’s cells from becoming damaged and prematurely aged. Studies have suggested that the combination of green tea and EGCG may also be beneficial by providing protection against certain types of cancers, including breast cancer. A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Mississippi researchers now finds that consuming EGCG significantly inhibits breast tumor growth in female mice. These results bring us one step closer to better understanding the disease and potentially new and naturally occurring therapies. 

The study was conducted by Jian-Wei Gu, Emily Young, Jordan Covington, James Wes Johnson, and Wei Tan, all of the Department of Physiology & Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. Dr. Gu will present his team’s findings, entitled, Oral Administration of EGCG, an Antioxidant Found in Green Tea, Inhibits Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth of Breast Cancer in Female Mice, at the  121st Annual Meeting of the American Physiological Society (APS; www.the-APS.org/press), part of the Experimental Biology 2008 scientific conference.

read more | 842 reads

Essential nutrient found in eggs reduces risk of breast cancer by 24 percent
By Dross at 2008-04-04 01:15
 

Park Ridge, Ill. (April 3, 2008) Choline, an essential nutrient found in foods such as eggs, is associated with a 24 percent reduced risk of breast cancer, according to a study supported by a grant from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), to be published in The FASEB Journal’s print issue in June.(1) This study adds to the growing body of evidence that links egg consumption to a decreased risk of breast cancer.

In this new case-control study of more than 3,000 adult women, the risk of developing breast cancer was 24 percent lower among women with the highest intake of choline compared to women with the lowest intake. Women with the highest intake of choline consumed a daily average of 455 mg of choline or more, getting most of it from coffee, eggs and skim milk. Women with the lowest intake consumed a daily average of 196 milligrams or less.

read more | 945 reads

MU researcher links hormone replacement therapy to breast cancer
By Dross at 2008-04-02 22:32
 

COLUMBIA, Mo. ¬— Millions of post-menopausal women use hormone replacement therapy (HRT) as a method to reduce symptoms associated with menopause. In a recent University of Missouri study, researchers found that one of the hormones used in HRT, a synthetic progestin, could be a major factor in promoting breast cancer. At the same time, the researchers have compelling evidence that using an antibodyterm that prevents new blood vessel formation in tumors, or a small molecular drug, known as PRIMA, with similar properties as the antibody may be effective in treating or preventing the negative effects of progestin.

read more | 680 reads

Breast cancer more aggressive among obese women
By admin at 2008-03-14 19:41
 

PHILADELPHIA – Women with breast cancer have more aggressive disease and lower survival rates if they are overweight or obese, according to findings published in the March 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

“The more obese a patient is, the more aggressive the disease,” said Massimo Cristofanilli, MD, associate professor of medicine in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. “We are learning that the fat tissue may increase inflammation that leads to more aggressive disease.”

read more | 3029 reads

COX-2 expression is marker for cancer development in some benign breast biopsies
By Dross at 2008-03-12 19:30
 

It’s a good news, bad news situation. Some women who have a breast biopsy are told that while they don’t have cancer, they do have atypical hyperplasia -- cells that aren’t quite normal and might become cancerous someday. This happens to one-fourth of women undergoing breast biopsies but no one knows which individuals are at risk.

In their quest to discover who is at risk, researchers at Mayo Clinic (http://mayoresearch.mayo.edu/mayo/research/womens_cancer/breast_excellence.cfm) are building a biopsy profile to try to predict cancer outcome, and in the March 11 online edition of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/rss/recent.xml), they report finding a new variable to add to this profile.

read more | 1303 reads

Drugs like aspirin could reduce breast cancer and help existing sufferers
By Dross at 2008-03-07 00:23
 

Anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin may reduce breast cancer by up to 20 per cent, according to an extensive review carried out by experts at London’s Guy’s Hospital and published in the March issue of IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice.

But they stress that further research is needed to determine the best type, dose and duration and whether the benefits of regularly using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) outweigh the side effectsterm, especially for high-risk groups.

“Our review of research published over the last 27 years suggests that, in addition to possible prevention, there may also be a role for NSAIDs in the treatment of women with established breast cancer” says Professor Ian Fentiman from the Hedley Atkins Breast Unit at the hospital, part of Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust.

read more | 3 comments | 1458 reads

High levels of estrogen associated with breast cancer recurrence
By Dross at 2008-03-07 00:21
 

Women whose breast cancer came back after treatment had almost twice as much estrogen in their blood than did women who remained cancer-free – despite treatment with anti-estrogen drugs in a majority of the women –according to researchers in a study published in the March issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

The findings suggest that high levels of estrogen contribute to an increased risk of cancer recurrence, just as they lead to the initial development of breast cancer, said the study’s lead author, Cheryl L. Rock, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego.

read more | 1581 reads

Health risks after cessation of postmenopausal hormone therapy
By Dross at 2008-03-05 22:36
 

The Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) investigators have produced another article [1], which probably marks the opening of another set of publications, in which the consequences of a further 2.4-year follow-up (after cessation of the study medication) on the estrogen + progestogen (E + P) cohort are reported. They concluded that, by the end of the post-intervention period, the global index, a newly formed and unvalidated tool used in the WHI trial, was still higher in women randomly assigned to receive E + P compared with placebo.

“After such long and painful debates over the results of the WHI study and the perception that age is a very important determinant of the benefit–risk evaluation, it is really a pity that once again the current information on the extended follow-up period is presented in an unsatisfactory way”, says Professor Amos Pines, the President of the International Menopause Society. It seems that the following mistakes were repeated:

read more | 643 reads

New target for cancer therapy may improve treatment for solid tumors
By Dross at 2008-03-04 01:50
 

Targeting and killing the non-malignant cells that surround and support a cancer can stop tumor growth in mice, reports a research team based at the University of Chicago Medical Center in the March 1, 2008, issue of the journal Cancer Research. The discovery offers a new approach to treating cancers that are resistant to standard therapy.

Many solid tumors develop elaborate mechanisms to prevent recognition and elimination by the immune system. Due to their genetic instability they often discard the tumor antigen-presenting cell-surface structures that alert the immune system that these cells are harmful. Without these “flags,” the white blood cells fail to recognize and kill infected or cancerous cells. These tumors then often grow rapidly and resist treatment with chemotherapyterm or efforts to boost the immune system's response to the tumor.

read more | 1383 reads

Test can reduce recurrence of breast cancer
By Dross at 2008-02-26 00:29
 

A new test that examines large sections of the sentinel lymph node for genes expressed by breast cancer could reduce the risk of recurrence and multiple surgeries, doctors say.

The GeneSearch Breast Lymph Node Assay, manufactured by Veridex, L.L.C., a Johnson & Johnson company, is being used at the Medical College of Georgia to examine half of the tissue in the sentinel lymph node, the first place breast cancer typically spreads. The sample represents more than 10 times the amount of tissue examined in traditional biopsies.

And because the test examines the tissue with molecular tools, it is more sensitive, says Dr. Zixuan (Zoe) Wang, molecular biologist and scientific director of MCG’s Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Diagnostic Labs, L.L.C. 

read more | 660 reads

Unsuspected protein determines resistance to breast cancer treatment
By Dross at 2008-02-05 01:43
 

A new research approach has identified a previously unsuspected protein as a key player in the resistance to particular forms of breast cancer therapy. The study, published by Cell Press in the February issue of Cancer Cell, significantly advances the understanding of the molecular response to breast cancer therapies that target estrogen signaling.

Most breast tumors express estrogen receptor and are dependent on estrogen signaling. Drugs that target this characteristic, such as tamoxifen, have had a major impact on breast cancer therapy as they interfere with the ability of estrogen to activate its receptor and, as a result, limit cellular proliferation.

read more | 1 comment | 1338 reads

BRCA1 mutation linked to breast cancer stem cells
By Dross at 2008-02-01 00:22
 

A new study may explain why women with a mutation in the BRCA1 gene face up to an 85 percent lifetime risk of breast cancer.

Researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center found that BRCA1 plays a role in regulating breast stem cells, the small number of cells that might develop into cancers.

The study, in mice and in human breast cancer cells, found that BRCA1 is involved in the stem cells differentiating into other breast tissue cells. When BRCA1 is missing, the stem cells accumulate unregulated and develop into cancer.

“Our data suggest that an important reason women with BRCA1 mutations get breast cancer is that BRCA1 is directly involved in the regulation of normal breast stem cells. In these women, loss of BRCA1 function results in the proliferation of breast stem cells. Since we believe that breast cancer may originate in these cells, this explains why these women have such a high incidence of breast cancer,” said senior study author Max S. Wicha, M.D., Distinguished Professor of Oncology and director of the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center.

read more | 1203 reads

Device Zeroes in on Small Breast Tumors
By Dross at 2008-01-29 23:25
 

A new medical imager for detecting and guiding the biopsy of suspicious breast cancer lesions is capable of spotting tumors that are half the size of the smallest ones detected by standard imaging systems, according to a new study.

The results of initial testing of the PEM/PET system, designed and constructed by scientists at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, West Virginia University School of Medicine and the University of Maryland School of Medicine will be published in the journal Physics in Medicine and Biology on Feb. 7.

read more | 982 reads

Kosan Initiates Phase 2 Trial of Alvespimycin, Second-Generation Hsp90 Inhibitor, in HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Can
By Dross at 2008-01-16 01:41
 

Kosan Biosciences Incorporated (NASDAQ:KOSN) today announced the initiation of a Phase 2 trial of alvespimycin, the company's second-generation Hsp90 inhibitor, in patients with HER2-positive metastaticterm breast cancer. Alvespimycin has demonstrated the potential to disrupt the activity of multiple oncogenes and cell signaling pathways implicated in tumor growth, including HER2, a key signaling pathway in breast cancer. The objective of the Phase 2 trial is to evaluate the safety and anticancer activity of alvespimycin as a single agent in patients who have not previously received Herceptin for metastatic disease except in an adjuvant setting. Antitumor data in patients with advanced HER2-positive cancer presented at the September 2007 American Society of Oncology (ASCO) Breast Cancer Symposium demonstrated encouraging antitumor activity of alvespimycin in combination with trastuzumab (Herceptin(R)).

read more | 1417 reads

Findings Point to Molecular 'Achilles Heel' for Half of Breast Cancer Tumors
By Dross at 2008-01-15 05:14
 

Washington, D.C. − Researchers at Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University Medical Center have shown why a protein known as cyclin D1 may be the Achilles heel for breast tumors that are estrogen receptor positive (ER+) − which is the most common type of breast cancer.

In the December 10th online edition of the journal Oncogene, investigators say the findings support testing an experimental class of drugs that aim to inhibit the cyclin D1 protein in women with ER+ breast cancers. These agents are currently being tested in this disease as well as in many other types of cancer, the researchers say, and the study provides additional molecular support for their use in breast cancer.

“Everyone knows that cyclin D1 is a huge player in breast cancer, but no one has shown what happens when cyclin D1 is absent at the same time that the estrogen receptor is being over-expressed on tumors. Now we know the answers, and we hope these insights help further our understanding and treatment of breast cancer,” said the study’s lead author, Maria Silvina Frech, Ph.D., who is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the National Cancer Institute but who worked on the study at Georgetown.

read more | 855 reads

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