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p53
New drug shrinks cancer in animals, U-M study shows
By Dross at 2011-04-06 23:21
 

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — A study led by researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center showed in animal studies that new cancer drug compounds they developed shrank tumors, with few side effects.

read more | 18947 reads

How eating fruit and vegetables can improve cancer patients' response to chemotherapy
By Dross at 2008-10-25 01:45
 

RIVERSIDE, Calif. – The leading cause of death in all cancer patients continues to be the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapyterm, a form of treatment in which chemicals are used to kill cells.

Now a study by UC Riverside biochemists that focuses on cancer cells reports that ingesting apigenin – a naturally occurring dietary agent found in vegetables and fruit – improves cancer cells' response to chemotherapy.

Xuan Liu, a professor of biochemistry, and Xin Cai, a postdoctoral researcher working in her lab, found that apigenin localizes tumor suppressor p53, a protein, in the cell nucleus – a necessary step for killing the cell that results in some tumor cells responding to chemotherapy.

read more | 1163 reads

Bladder cancer detected via amplified gene in cells found in urine
By Dross at 2008-09-24 21:04
 

HOUSTON - Counting the copies of a specific gene in cells gathered from a urine sample may provide a simple, noninvasive way to detect bladder cancer, a team led by researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reports in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

When the telltale gene, Aurora kinase A, is numerous and overexpressed in urothelial cells, errors during cell division follow, the team also found. The new cells have too few or too many chromosomes, instead of the normal pairs of 23 chromosomes.

"Abnormal chromosome counts are the most fundamental feature - the signature - of human cancers," said senior author Bogdan Czerniak, M.D., Ph.D., professor in M. D. Anderson's Department of Pathology. "We have further clarified the role that the Aurora kinase A gene (AURKA) plays in this misaggregation of chromosomes in bladder cancer.

read more | 1 comment | 1307 reads

Stabilizing cancer-fighting p53 can also shield a metastasis-promoter
By Dross at 2008-05-22 22:28
 

HOUSTON - Efforts to protect the tumor-suppressor p53 could just as easily shelter a mutant version of the protein, causing cancer cells to thrive and spread rather than die, according to research by scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reported in the current issue of the journal Genes and Development.

"As we develop therapies to restore the function of p53, we need to make sure we first know what version of this gene is present in a patient's tumor and then decide how to treat it," said senior author Guillermina Lozano, Ph.D., professor and chair of M. D. Anderson's Department of Cancer Genetics.

read more | 2 comments | 1062 reads

Evolution of human genome's 'guardian' gives people unique protections from DNA damage
By Dross at 2008-01-17 01:41
 

CINCINNATI – Human evolution has created enhancements in key genes connected to the p53 regulatory network – the so-called guardian of the genome – by creating additional safeguards in human genes to boost the network’s ability to guard against DNA damage that could cause cancer or a variety of genetic diseases, an international team of scientists led by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center writes in the Jan. 22 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Because genetically engineered mouse models are increasingly powerful tools in understanding the risks and mechanisms of human diseases – and rodents do not have the same evolution-based safeguards in p53 function as humans – the study also underscores the need for additional considerations in the interpretation of research using rodent models.

read more | 925 reads

PENN Medicine News: Penn Researchers Find Diabetes Drug Kills Some Cancer Cells
By Dross at 2007-08-15 03:40
 

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that a commonly prescribed diabetes drug kills tumor cells that lack a key regulatory gene called p53. Results from current studies in mice may result in new therapies for a subset of human cancers that tend to be aggressive and resistant to existing treatments. Additionally, the findings open up a new avenue for targeting cancers whose hallmark is the absence of this regulatory gene.

read more | 1803 reads

Gene thought to assist chemo may help cancer thrive
By Dross at 2007-05-16 08:43
 

A gene thought to be essential in helping chemotherapyterm kill cancer cells, may actually help them thrive. In a new study of chemo patients, scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Ovarian Cancer Institute found that 70 percent of subjects whose tumors had mutations in the gene p53 were still alive after five years. Patients with normal p53 displayed only a 30 percent survival rate. The findings raise the possibility of a new strategy for fighting cancer - namely, developing drugs to disable the functioning of this gene in the tumors of patients undergoing chemotherapy. The results appear in the May 16 edition of the open access journal PLoS ONE.

read more | 4 comments | 1201 reads

Preventing cancer without killing cells
By Dross at 2007-03-30 21:42
 

Inducing senescence in aged cells may be sufficient to guard against spontaneous cancer development, according to a paper published online this week in EMBO reports. It was previously unknown whether cellular senescence or programmed cell death – apoptosis – was the more important safeguard mechanism for suppressing tumours arising from dysfunctional telomeres.

Aged cells have abnormal chromosomes with dysfunctional telomeres – shorter ends – that can promote tumorigenesis in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53, and may be related to the higher incidence of cancer in older individuals. However, in the presence of p53, dysfunctional telomeres can induce a permanent arrest of cell growth, known as senescence. Sandy Chang and colleagues studied mutant mice with dysfunctional telomeres and copies of the p53 gene that cannot initiate p53-dependent apoptosis but can execute p53-mediated senescence.

read more | 960 reads

'Guardian of the genome' protein found to underlie skin tanning
By Dross at 2007-03-09 01:25
 

A protein known as the "master watchman of the genome" for its ability to guard against cancer-causing DNA damage has been found to provide an entirely different level of cancer protection: By prompting the skin to tan in response to u

ltraviolet light from the sun, it deters the development of melanoma skin cancer, the fastest-increasing form of cancer in the world.

In a study in the March 9 issue of the journal Cell, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute report that the protein, p53, is not only linked to skin tanning, but also may play a role in people's seemingly universal desire to be in the sun – an activity that, by promoting tanning, can reduce one's risk of melanoma.

read more | 1950 reads

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